Blogging · Digital · Google · housing · innovation

Why all orgs should ‘Default to Open’

We’ve all heard of the term Open by Default, right? Its the principle by which governments and increasingly organisations make its data and information accessible to the public by default, unless there is a sufficient justification to explain that greater public interest may be at stake, as a result of disclosure.

For most organisations I would argue that a default to open stance is vital. It helps to build stakeholder relationships both internally and externally, instills a ‘nothing to hide here’ mantra and genuinely promotes open network building.

This is no different in the world of Housing where there has been an every increasing drive towards transparency, with the most recent example being the publishing of organisational gender pay gap information to the public. This is combined with the ever changing world of work meaning that current and future employees more than ever value open and flexible organisations, where they can feel part of a ‘high trust’ culture.

Social Media:

Consider the use of social media. Turn back the clock to before Twitter and Facebook and how many people would have considered telling anyone (and everyone) in the world almost anything. Now its commonly accepted that people and organisations use multiple social media platforms. I for one use quite a few platforms, with the vast majority of my use for professional purposes.

But the key point here is that I use Twitter in particular as my form of ‘default to open’ approach, in that I will share what I am working on at work. This inevitably runs the chance of some negative (and positive) comments, which at times can be quite difficult to accept, but I can hand on heart say that I am a better professional for having these conversations and debating the points.

Open Source:

android

Another example of default to open is the rise of the term ‘open source’. Open source is often used to describe projects or software where. Google’s Android is one such Open Source Project. Some would argue that one of the main reasons for its success has been the fact that Google opened up Android to developers for free and as a result, it has become one of the most used operating systems for mobiles and tablets ever. Chances are you own at least one device that runs on Android.

Closer to the world of housing, but similarly open in nature, there is an ever increasing range of open source 3D print floor plans available on the net.

Think of almost anything and you can find an open source version on the internet.

New Digital Age:

The NDA

Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen cover much of this and more in their book titled ‘The New Digital Age’. The book is a fascinating and challenging read, and for anyone truly interested in digital, I would recommend reading it. At times it is downright scary, but much of what they write about is an important view into our likely digital future. If you think default to open is a challenging concept, this is the just the beginning of where digital things are heading.

What about you?:

So how about you?

  • Do you work in an open organisation?
  • What about your personal approach to work?

I would love to hear your thoughts – please leave a comment below!

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innovation

A Few Thoughts on Defining Innovation

I’ve been asked many times for my definition of ‘innovation’, so here’s a quick post of my thoughts.

Innovation doesn’t always mean a huge change – it doesn’t always have to be something spectacularly large or life changing. Some of the best innovations I can think of are really small, but make a real difference to peoples lives every day – everyday innovations.

Innovation is a word often overused – the definition of innovation is a new idea, method or product, but it isn’t always ground breaking (or even new). Some people are just better at promoting their (not so new) innovations. Innovation for innovations sake.

Innovation as a process – this is something I really like. Improving an idea or concept by a step process, rather than it being seen as something only the few creative individuals in the world can do, like magic. I would go as far to say that almost anyone can innovate.

Innovation can be whatever you want it to be – it’s down to the individual or organisation to define what their view of innovation really is. Is it a linear process that means you can achieve true ‘innovation’ or a continuous process, or even something in-built into your personal/organisational culture?

Whilst on the subject of innovations, here is one of my all-time favourite innovations – the ‘lucky iron fish‘.

ironfish

The Lucky Iron Fish is a small iron cooking tool that infuses your meals with a healthy amount of natural iron to help prevent iron deficiency and anemia. It’s simple to use, and provides a natural source of iron that’s perfect for everyone, especially those with an increased need for iron: athletes, vegetarians, vegans and women.

 

Google · housing · innovation

Innovative thinking in #ukhousing

Stevejobs

I have been reading Walter Isaacson’s Steve Jobs biography over the past few months. It’s a fascinating read and although Steve Jobs character is hard to like a lot of the time, I really like his approach to business, constant innovation and striving for the best. There are a lot of Jobs quotes I like, but this one in particular jumps out:

“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower”

It has got me thinking. Where is the truly innovative thinking in #ukhousing ? I’m talking about truly innovative thinking, that stretches the currently accepted norms and could truly move the sector forwards?

What strikes me most is the backdrop for Steve Jobs’ success; it’s not just about his drive and innovation, but the team of really talented people he brought together and worked with. So, following this thought through, it stands to reason that one of the keys for innovative success is to build an ‘A Class’ team (to use another Job’s quote).

How many ‘#ukhousing organisation’s truly create an ‘A Class’ team around innovative thinking? One where they sweat the detail, but under a truly challenging vision of the future? To borrow an idea from another favorite innovation organisation of mine – Google – their ‘big ideas: 10x thinking’ approach to work is also a great way to push the boundaries of what’s possible. Its by thinking big that you get big innovations.

So much of this goes back to getting the right building blocks in place in an organistion – the right culture, the right leadership and building an ‘A Class’ team.

So, going back to the Steve Jobs quote, would you consider yourself an innovative leader or a follower? Are you truly pushing the boundaries wherever possible?

 

Digital · innovation

Digital Innovators Network – Part II

y lab

This is the second installment of my Digital Innovators Network blog posts (you can read the first one here).

The second meeting of the Network was held last Friday in the Shared Resource Centre in Blaenafon, South Wales.

The theme for this network  meeting was Open Data, something which I had heard of but knew very little about. I was pleasantly surprised at the beginning that the vast majority of the network attendees had very little experience or knowledge of open data!

So to the day itself. The day took the form of a training session by the Open Data Institute and the main trainer, Ben Cave, really knew his subject matter. The acid test for me was that, despite starting my car journey at 6am that morning, I was fully awake and engaged throughout the day (no small feat!) and was still buzzing with ideas after the 3 and a half hour drive back up North. I came away with a better understanding of open data, how it can work, some of the pitfalls, the need to use a license when offering open data and some wider considerations around the use of open data.

The two stand out quotes from the day for me were:

  • ‘Data is a means, not an end’.
  • ‘Don’t think of data purely as numbers’.

A few other interesting things to point out:

  • Members of the Digital Innovators Network are predominantly sharing/networking through Slack. This is the first time I’ve used Slack properly and I have to say it is working really well (and saves on excessive Emails!);
  • There is a really wide range of digital representatives in the network, including health, local authority, education, welsh government, housing associations and third sector;
  • I can already tick the ‘learning new skills and knowledge’ aim for being a network member.

In terms of open data, I would have to confess that despite having the full days training around this, I would need to do a lot more reading around the subject before I could suggest an open data project within my organisation. Thankfully, the Open Data Institute have a lot of handy information on their website, including the really useful ‘Open Data in a Day‘ slides.

For one thing, I will be keeping a look out for any open data project successes from the Housing sector, as this will certainly help bridge the gap between the idea of open data and the results it can give. This also ties in with a much wider conversation going on currently within Housing and beyond about the use, relevance and validity of the data we hold.

Definitely food for thought!

 

Digital · innovation

Digital Innovators Network – part 1

y lab

Just before Christmas, I applied to be a member of the new Digital Innovators Network and a few weeks into January I received the fantastic Email telling me I was in!

Firstly, a bit of new about the network. The network is run by Y Lab, which is a NestaCardiff University partnership to act as a bridge and broker, connecting policy makers and public service practitioners with research and innovation expertise. The network is an experimental process, drawing together a cohort of leaders, expert in their sector, with a diverse range of skills and experiences. The network also forms a part of the Digital Innovation Fund launched by Welsh Government of £250,000 to boost public service capacity in developing digital services across Wales.

So, on a very wet and windy Friday in January, I caught the 5.15am train from North Wales down to Cardiff for the first network meeting. After being dropped off by the taxi driver ‘somewhere nearby’, I made it just in time for the start.

The first speaker was Bill Sharpe from Independent Futures Research and Consulting. Bill started off by saying he wrote his first computer programme nearly 50 years ago and spent fifteen years working for Hewlett Packard corporate labs in Bristol, before setting up his own consultancy. Bill talked about his ‘three horizons model’ of innovation, illustrated below:

3horizons

If you ever hear someone asking whether you are a H1, H2 or H3, then this is the model being referred to (hint: as an innovator you would much rather be a H3).

This then led on to a talk by Matt Lewis, Senior Architect at the DVLA. The DVLA are a UK wide digital innovation success story and Matt led us through how they reached where they have today. Below is one of the slides:

dvla

What struck me most about Matt’s talk was how the DVLA had radically changed their business focus, not on a big bang approach, but rather on a number of continuous digital innovations, as shown in the above slide.

After some time networking over lunch with some of the other network members which included representatives from the Police, Arts Council for Wales, Councils and third sector organisations, we then had a workshop run by The Social Innovation Partnership on theory of change. The basic aim was to get everyone thinking about what their potential digital innovation funding application aim would be. The outcome was that most people were not really clear what the end goal was, but rather new what the next stage would be.

So now as a network, we have gone away to have a think about potential projects that we would like to put forwards to the Digital Innovation Accelerator funding, in order to initiate our own innovative project. Like everyone else, I went away thinking this was a fantastic opportunity to apply for some funding towards doing something truly digitally innovative, but of course, I need to flesh out some ideas first. The network itself offered a chance to talk to people outside of my usual sphere of contacts and to learn what their challenges and successes have been.

Watch this space for more news as the network continues!