I have been asked a few times recently why I write a blog. The simple answer is that I love a challenge.

It is easy to think about doing something, but another thing to actually do it.

In the case of blog writing, I’d often come up with things I had some views about, often different to the ones I read about, so one day I decided I may as well try and write them down.

Not that this has always been easy. After successfully writing my first blog post, I then hit a substantial block wall which I couldn’t get past. I would either come up with a blog post title but no content, or a few lines of interest that I could never gel together into a decent post.

In the end I just kept at it. It’s got easier over time. Sometimes I can even write a few blog posts within days of each other, meaning I’ve got one in the bag. I have got lots of half written blog posts as well, where I have got the semblance of a blog post, but not been able to flesh it out enough. Often these have been missing that killer post title, the killer stat or the tag line that would actually make people want to bother reading it.

So, what have I learnt so far? Here are just a few of the things:

  1. Be clear what you are going to blog about. I was definitely guilty of blogging about anything and everything, but risked visitors not having a clue what my posts would be about.
  2. Come up with catchy blog post title. If I do nothing else, I spend a lot of time making sure this is as snappy (and clear) as possible to get people’s attention. I often ask a question in the title, hoping it will gain someone’s interest (I am pretty sure I got this trick from reading other peoples blogs).
  3. Blog regularly. This has been a challenge at times. I have made promises to myself that I’ll write something every week, or every two week, and I’ve often failed. The truth is I need to have something to write about or it’s a waste of everyone’s time.
  4. Use Social Media. Through my Twitter (@brettsadler77) and LinkedIn pages I’ve managed to gain much greater exposure of my blog posts.
  5. Don’t worry about the number of followers. My experience of using WordPress is that, even after a few years of blogging, I’m only just approaching 50 blog followers. This is no reflection on what I’ve written, more that people just don’t follow people’s blogs on WordPress.
  6. Don’t worry if no-one likes or comments. This depends a lot on what you are writing about. If you are asking lots of question and being quite challenging, then you may well get some comments, but if you are telling people something, then you may not. The same goes for likes. I’ve thought many times that a blog post hasn’t been listened to, only to find out during a random conversation that they liked something I had said in a previous post.
  7. Set a target. I set myself a target of 4000 views of my blog by the end of this year. I’ve nearly hit that already, with a few months to spare. Granted this might not work for everyone, but for me it helped to keep me focused.

If you are a blog writer reading this post, I hope these tips have been of help. The same goes to the aspiring blog writer (just give it a go). If you have given it some thought before now, maybe you should consider writing a blog of your very own? It can be amazingly rewarding.